Mentoring

Me? A Mentor?
MCMN is dedicated to reaching children in Martin County between the ages of 5-17. Couples, families, or individuals are encouraged to serve as role models to children in need of a supportive friendship.

MCMN will provide you with a helpful orientation and training session, then match you, according to the need, to a young person within your local area. The coordinator will play a supportive role and assist you in your mentoring relationship.

MCMN offers support to you through newsletters, support meetings, youth outreach activities, resource material, and personal contact.

Mentors Make A Difference!
There's an old saying: "If you need something done, ask a busy person." That surely applies to mentoring. Busy people you see everyday in your community- business owners, homemakers, farmers, teaches, retired persons, and "empty-nesters" are just a few of the many who can make a difference!

Choose Your Mentoring Style!
In addition to the traditional one-on-one mentoring, MCMN also offers and welcomes team mentoring! You can mentor a child with your family, or as a team(husband/wife, mother/daughter, father/son, etc.). Whatever it is that you already do as a family or individual, try including one more person...a child in need of a supportive friend.

What is a Mentor?

  • Mentoring is a structured relationship or partnership that focuses on the needs of a young person.
  • A mentor can provide guidance, friendship, positive reinforcement, and a constructive example.
  • Mentoring gives encouragement to children who are at risk of not reaching their potential.
  • Mentors give support to children who face many challenges in their life.
  • Mentoring can help develop social skills as well as life and academic skills.
  • Mentors give hope and promise to children who are exposed to high risk situations.

What Do Mentors Do?
Mentors meet with their young friend on a regular basis, 2 to 4 times a month or more, sharing mutual interests.
Shared activities can include:
  • Bike riding, walking, fishing and gardening
  • Baking, woodworking and craft projects
  • Bowling, golfing and scrap booking

Mentors can also share their favorite hobby, cheer from the sidelines of their mentee's game, help with homework, prepare and share a meal together.

What Does It Take To Be A Mentor?
The desire to help make a difference in the life of a child and the willingness to maintain a mentoring relationship for at least one year.

A Mentor For My Child?
If you are interested in having a mentor for your child, please do the following:
  • Complete an application form giving your child permission to participate in the mentoring program.
  • Meet with the mentoring program coordinator.
  • Provide helpful information about your child.
  • Allow your child to keep scheduled meeting times with the mentor.
  • Communicate with your child's mentor on a regular basis.

What Is A Mentor?
  • A mentor is an adult volunteer who is willing to maintain a consistent friendship with your child.
  • Mentoring is a structured friendship that focuses on the needs of your child.
  • A mentor will provide your child with guidance, friendship, positive reinforcement, and will set a good example.
  • A mentor can help your child with homework, help develop social skills, and teach life skills.
  • Mentors give support to children and families who may face challenges.
  • Mentors recognize the importance of good self esteem and will work to promote positive, healthy self esteem in your child.

What Do Mentors Do?
Think of adults who played an important role in your life as a child. Who was your special friend? A Neighbor, a teacher, a pastor, or a friend's parents?
Now you have an opportunity to provide that same kind of special friend for your child.
Mentors meet with their young friend on a regular basis, 2 to 4 times a month or more, sharing mutual interests.
Shared activities can include:
  • Bike riding, walking, fishing and gardening
  • Baking, woodworking and craft projects
  • Bowling, golfing and scrap booking
A Mentor is a special friend, a good listener, a coach, and a responsive adult.
A Mentor is not a substitute parent! They recognize that you, as a parent, are the ultimate authority in your child's life and will try to support your family system.

Can I Trust a Mentor?
The Martin County Mentoring Network screens all volunteers and requires mentors to:
  • Submit to a complete criminal history background check.
  • Provide three personal references(and we check them).
  • Attend a training and orientation session.
  • Sign an agreement to keep information about your child and family confidential.


Contact the program coordinator for more information about being a mentor, or to inquire about receiving mentoring services for a child.

Contact Kinship
507-238-4440